This Moment is mine and I will NEVER fucking hand it over to booze

*********

I am on a BlogCation.

I am enjoying spending time with my son and tending to my garden.

I may be on a BlogCation, that does not mean, by any stretch of the imagination, that I am on a vacation from Reality.

I can not leave my mother behind. I see her everywhere.

I see her in the older women at the grocery store with their caregivers. I see her in the Bar Flies I see through the windows as I pass on the way to get ice cream with the kids.

I see her everywhere and can not escape her absence.

My mother died of Wernicke – Korsakoff: alcoholics dementia.

My mother was a life long drunk.

  She died an  intelligent woman trapped in small moment of time.

Alcohol had eaten its way through my mother’s brain leaving her in This Moment…

This Moment.

She was not  Buddhist. Living in This Moment was not what she wanted.

She wanted to work the New York Times crossword puzzle.

She wanted to remember where she hid her booze.

I am caring for my son.

I am making him a priority in my life and I am clean;

clean as a fucking whistle.

I see my mother in me. I see my mother in my sister.

I see her in what we do NOT do:

we do not forget our children.

We are breaking the cycle by caring for our children.

We are breaking the cycle.

My sister sent this article from the BBC.

I see my mother in this article.

I see myself and my sister too:

I see us in the choices we make.

We are NOT drunks and we never will be.

I am also in This Moment but it is a choice I am making

not one made by default.

This Moment is mine  and I will NEVER fucking hand it over to booze.

Never.

Beware. Alcohol Kills.

Peace,

well not so much in This Moment,

but perhaps,

in the next,

Jen

I love you Andrea.

Thank you for sending this article

Thank you for being the extraordinary Mother and Friend that you are.

****************

Drinking alcohol, even in moderation, ‘a dementia risk’

By Michelle Roberts

 

Health editor, BBC News online

(Glass sizes and alcohol percentage determines how many units a drink contains)

  1. Older adults ‘drink more often’
  2. Older drinkers ‘need lower limit’
  3. ‘A little too much drink’ warning

Drinking even “moderate” amounts of alcohol increases dementia risk, US research suggests.

The findings, presented at an international conference, challenge the notion that some alcohol could be good for ageing brains.

People who stick to recommended alcohol limits are still at risk, as well as bingers and heavy drinkers, according to the work.

The study tracked the health over 20 years of 1,300 women in their mid-60s.

The risk, ranging from mild cognitive impairment to full blown dementia, was higher among those who reported drinking more alcohol.

 

 

“Many people will drink to relax and it’s important to keep an eye on the amount of alcohol we consume”

Dr Marie Janson

Alzheimer’s Research UK

Women who switched from abstinence to drinking over the course of the study also increased their risk.

Those who drank alcohol “in moderation”, meaning seven to 14 alcoholic drinks a week, were also more likely to develop problems with memory and brain functioning that can be a warning sign of future dementia.

The lower end of this range falls within the UK’s recommended limit for women, but since alcohol measures in the US are larger than in the UK, 14 drinks a week would exceed this UK weekly cut off.

And since the study only looked at women, it is not possible to say if the same link will apply in elderly men.

Researcher Tina Hoang, of the Veterans Health Research Institute in San Francisco, said: “In this group of older women, moderate alcohol consumption was not protective.

Continue reading the main story

UK Alcohol limits

  1. Men – 3-4 units a day
  2. Women – 2-3 units a day
  3. One unit of alcohol is 8g or about half a pint of lager, a small glass (125ml) of wine or a 25ml of spirits

“Clinicians should carefully assess their older patients for both how much they drink and any changes in patterns of alcohol use.”

She told the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference that it might be that brains become more vulnerable to the effects of alcohol as we age.

Some UK experts have recommended alcohol limits should be even tighter for older people for this reason.

Alternatively, the researchers say the link could be caused by factors that drive people to drink – stress or bereavement, for example.

Continue reading the main story

US alcohol limits

  1. The US Government definition of “a drink” is 14g of alcohol
  2. Men – no more than 2 drinks a day
  3. Women – no more than one drink a day

At the same meeting, another group of US researchers presented more work showing the potential harms of binge drinking.

Among the 5,075 men and women they studied, those who reported heavy bouts of drinking – at least one episode per month – were more likely to experience dementia-like problems.

Fortnightly binges doubled the risk.

Drinking alcohol can cause your blood pressure and blood cholesterol to rise which, in turn, can damage the blood vessels supplying the brain, causing problems like vascular dementia.

Men are advised to drink no more than three to four units of alcohol a day, and women no more than two to three units a day. A unit of alcohol is equal to about half a pint of normal strength lager, a small glass of wine or a pub measure (25ml) of spirits.

Dr Marie Janson, of Alzheimer’s Research UK ,said: “In a country with major concerns over binge drinking, these new findings should be taken seriously by people of all ages.

“There is mounting evidence linking alcohol consumption to cognitive decline, but this research delves deeper by examining the effects of different drinking patterns in more detail.

“These researchers found that in older people, even moderate drinking may have a harmful effect, in contrast to some previous research suggesting that moderate drinking may bring benefits.

“Such differing findings underline the need for more in-depth studies to tease out how different drinking patterns affect cognition.

“Many people will drink to relax and it’s important to keep an eye on the amount of alcohol we consume.”

She said that the best advice was to keep alcohol consumption light throughout life to reap some benefits and protect against the risks of over-indulging.

More on This Story

Related Stories

  1. Older adults ‘drink more often’
    08 MARCH 2012, HEALTH
  2. Older drinkers ‘need lower limit’
    21 JUNE 2011, HEALTH
  3. ‘A little too much drink’ warning
    04 FEBRUARY 2012, HEALTH
  4. What alcohol does to our bodies
    01 OCTOBER 2011, HEALTH
  5. Binge drinkers ‘risking dementia’
    01 NOVEMBER 2008, HEALTH

~ by Step On a Crack on July 18, 2012.

6 Responses to “This Moment is mine and I will NEVER fucking hand it over to booze”

  1. I thought the article may hit an old cord. I did not realize it would produce something so amazing. You rock as a writer, a sister, a mother and a best friend. Thank you. 

    Like

  2. These articles terrify me. I picture this huge bottle of Annie Green Springs chasing me down Iowa Avenue and stomping on my shoddy brain. God, protect me: Never turn your back on a bottle! xoxox mel

    Like

  3. Hope all is well with with you blog-vacation, CS

    Like

  4. i saw the same information on Yahoo today: http://news.yahoo.com/alcohol-may-not-kind-aging-brain-130407519.html?_esi=1

    Nice of you to pop in and say “hi”!

    Like

  5. Whew. I’m glad I’m not ‘older’ and drink ‘much’. What relief.

    Like

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